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Occasionally after one has received dental treatment an ulcerative sore on the gums or inside the mouth may occur. This sore is known as an aphthous ulcer or canker sore. It appears as a round yellowish or whitish ulceration on the lips, cheeks, tongue, and/or floor of the mouth. It can be single or multiple in number. The area is often painful.

The exact cause of canker sores is unknown. However, it is believed that certain immune factors such as stress, chemical or physical insult, food or liquid sensitivity, change in sleeping patterns, etc., all of which dental treatment can naturally affect, can induce the formation of canker sores. Even biting the inside of the cheek or tongue, brushing, flossing, or chewing sharp, hard foods can trigger a canker sore. These sores are not contagious.

Treatment is primarily symptomatic and palliative, focusing on making the child more comfortable eating and drinking. An over-the-counter topical paste such as Orabase by Colgate or Zilactin can be applied to the ulcer two to four times a day especially before meals. This will protect and cover the ulcer from irritation by liquids or foods and allow the ulcer to heal spontaneously. With or without medication, healing will take about seven to ten days.

Avoid salty, spicy, or hot liquids and foods. Toothpaste may cause irritation to the ulcer, but every effort to keep the surrounding area and teeth clean is essential. An over-the-counter, aspirin-free analgesic medication may be used as necessary according to product directions for pain relief.


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Teeth, Gums, And Diabetes

IT MIGHT SEEM LIKE diabetes and oral health have little to do with each other, but this is unfortunately not the case. One of the most common effects of diabetes is, in fact, gum disease, and the two conditions can actually make each other harder to deal with. This is why we want to make sure all of our patients have the information they need about the relationship between diabetes and oral health problems.

The Basics Of Diabetes

Diabetes is a chronic disease that affects how the body makes and uses insulin, a crucial hormone that regulates blood glucose levels. When the pancreas can’t produce insulin (type 1 diabetes) or the body can’t use it properly (type 2 and gestational diabetes), this leads to hyperglycemia. What does this mean for the teeth and gums? Well, high blood sugar both weakens the immune system and feeds bad oral bacteria, leaving diabetics vulnerable to oral inflammation and decay. 

How Diabetes Affects Oral Health

By this point, it shouldn’t come as a surprise that 22 percent of diabetics suffer from gum disease, ranging from gingivitis (inflammation) to periodontitis (advanced gum disease), which threatens the health of the teeth, gums, and even the underlying bone. Bacteria from gum disease can also endanger overall health if it reaches the bloodstream, making blood sugar even harder to regulate.

Some of the symptoms to watch out for include red, swollen, or bleeding gums, gum recession, bad breath, and loosened teethAnother diabetic symptom that increases the risk of developing gum disease is dry mouth, because saliva is crucial for regulating the mouth’s pH and washing away bacteria and food particles.

While we’re focusing on gum disease, uncontrolled diabetes can also lead to a variety of other oral health problems, including dry mouth, impaired or slower healing, burning mouth syndrome, salivary gland enlargement, more frequent and severe infections, and fungal infections.

Fighting Back Against Diabetes

The good news for our patients who struggle with diabetes is that good oral health is still within your grasp, and keeping your mouth healthy will also make your diabetes easier to control! By brushing twice a day for two minutes with a soft-bristled brush and fluoride toothpaste, flossing daily, avoiding smoking, and being careful with your sugar intake, you can keep your teeth and gums healthy.

The Role Of The Dentist

Just as crucial as your brushing and flossing routine is making regular trips to the dentist, and that might mean more than the standard two appointments a year. To play it safe, we recommend three or four yearly visits for diabetic patients. It is also essential that your doctor and your dental health care provider have the right information to be able to work as a team to keep you, your teeth, and your gums healthy.

We’re here to help you in your fight for good oral health! Please call us at 201.662.1922 or book an appointment.

 


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TOOTHBRUSH We all use it o take care of our teeth, but what are we doing to take care of our toothbrushes? It’s critical that our toothbrushes remain in good condition so they can do their jobs of keeping our teeth healthy, which is why we’re dedicating a blog post to giving our patients tips on toothbrush care!

Cleaning Your Toothbrush

Running your toothbrush under water and giving it a good shake won’t do much to get rid of all the germs you just brushed off your teeth, especially if you’ve recently battled the flu or a cold. Luckily, there are a few ways to deep-clean your toothbrush. Boiling the bristles for a few minutes will kill any germs on them, as will soaking the toothbrush in mouthwash. You can also sanitize it by placing it in the silverware rack of the dishwasher and running it without detergent.

Toothbrush Storage Dos and Don’ts

Do you store your toothbrush with the bristles on the counter or shelf, in a toothbrush cover, or near your toilet? Don’t! Bacteria needs warmth and moisture to multiply and spread, and flushing your toilet can send microscopic contaminants all over your bathroom. The best way to keep bacteria from growing on your toothbrush is to store it upright somewhere it can air out. It’s also a good idea to keep it well away from your toilet, and always put the lid down before flushing.

When To Replace Your Toothbrush

Getting used to a new toothbrush can feel weird. The bristles don’t feel the same, the shape is different, and the handle isn’t the same in your hand. But if we want our teeth to get the proper cleaning they deserve, this brief transition period is more than worth it.

If the bristles on your brush are getting bent, worn, or frayed, it’s definitely time for a new one — particularly if they’re sticking out the wrong way, because that won’t do your teeth any good! Bristles need to be straight in order to reach all the places they should. Just as important: have they become discolored? You don’t want to brush your teeth with stained, dirty bristles!

Get Creative With Your Old Toothbrush

Old toothbrushes are excellent tools for cleaning hard-to-reach areas in your house, like tile grout and backsplashes. You could boil it to make it soft, then bend it into a colorful bracelet! Toothbrushes also make great paintbrushes.

To make your toothbrush art minty fresh, use toothpaste as your paint!

Need Toothbrush Recommendations?

Looking for a new toothbrush but not sure which one is right for you? Just ask us and we’ll give you a recommendation! Keep up those great brushing habits, and don’t forget to schedule your regular dental appointments! Call us at 201.662.1922 or book online for your next dental appointment.

Thank you for your trust and friendship!

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The content on this blog is not intended to be a substitute for professional medical advice, diagnosis, or treatment. Always seek the advice of qualified health providers with questions you may have regarding medical conditions.

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Our Location

Located in West New York

Dentist West New York

6408 Bergenline Ave Ste 2, West New York NJ 07093

We are conveniently located on Bergenline Ave between 64th and 65th Street (next to USPS Post Office)

Serving residents of West New York, Guttenberg, North Bergen, Union City, Weehawken, Hoboken, Jersey City, Secaucus, Fairview, Cliffside Park and neighboring towns of Hudson County and Bergen County.


We provide treatment for periodontal/gum disease, bad breath, gingivitis, bleeding gums, cavities, abscessed tooth, sensitive tooth, missing tooth, chipped tooth, cracked tooth, crooked teeth. We also specialize in veneers, clear braces (Invisalign), dental implants, tooth extraction, wisdom tooth extraction, white spot removal, teeth whitening, root canal therapy, endodontics, full or partial dentures, hybrid dentures and more. Have a tooth ache or a dental emergency? We are open Saturdays & Sundays to take care of your dental emergencies. We are most trusted and highly rated dental office in West New York and Hudson County!

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